Monday-Mama-Moments

  1. Such a tough thing. And something that isn't brought up near enough!

  2. I haven't had children but this was very interesting. Its good to see this point of view!

  3. Here I am at 32 weeks preggo with number 2 and totally suffering from prepartum depression like I never knew was possible, so yeah I LOVED this post. Thank you.

  4. Such great advice! Thank you 🙂

  5. Great post!! I don't have kids yet but I will always remember this post for when I do get pregnant! I love #2 🙂

  6. Wonderful advice! I'll have to keep this in mind for when the time comes. 🙂

  7. i think that's the issue with facebook to begin with though.. most people only want to share the good moments or the highlights.. so that nobody ever assumes that it's tough.. and if they're always complaining.. then people like to take them off their feed. so there really isn't a way to win!

  8. Stefany T says:

    I struggled with depression for years before getting pregnant so I knew my chances of developing PPD were significantly higher. I spoke with my doctor about it before my babies were even born. It was so important to be to be proactive rather than reactive. I wish it were so easy for all women to talk about.

  9. Carly says:

    Thank you so much for writing about postpartum depression. There definitely are a lot of stigmas about it.

  10. Awesome that she shared! Awareness is so important!

  11. YES. I was nodding throughout this whole post. I can relate to everything. Thanks for sharing!! Great job. The more I research PPD, the more I've learned that it's actually quite common for the PPD symptoms to manifest themselves between 4-6 months after the baby. My symptoms crept up around 4 months post partum, which caught me off-guard and led me to believe it was something else other than PPD. I had no idea!! With your first baby, you have no context for how difficult it's supposed to be. You always just hear that it's “really hard”. I am working on a post for my own blog to tell my friends and family what I've “experienced” these past 8 months. I have only told a few close friends and a couple of family members about my depression. It's really personal and incredibly tender to talk about these experiences and so I hesitate because people tend to paint a silver lining on other's gray clouds (i.e. trials). A few people I have shared my PPD news with simply blew it off and said, “Oh, you just need to spend more time around people!” (unhelpful advice) or “Yeah, I had depression for about 3 weeks. Then it just kind of went away” as if it was something that just goes away on its' own, which it most certainly does not. I think one point I would add to your list is: It goes away as you adjust to being a mom. (Because when it's a biological imbalance, there is NO way it goes away on its' own, no matter how hard you wish and try and work to be your normal, sane, happy, pre-baby self. It's a really frustrating thing 🙁

  12. YES. I was nodding throughout this whole post. I can relate to everything. Thanks for sharing!! Great job. The more I research PPD, the more I've learned that it's actually quite common for the PPD symptoms to manifest themselves between 4-6 months after the baby. My symptoms crept up around 4 months post partum, which caught me off-guard and led me to believe it was something else other than PPD. I had no idea!! With your first baby, you have no context for how difficult it's supposed to be. You always just hear that it's “really hard”. I am working on a post for my own blog to tell my friends and family what I've “experienced” these past 8 months. I have only told a few close friends and a couple of family members about my depression. It's really personal and incredibly tender to talk about these experiences and so I hesitate because people tend to paint a silver lining on other's gray clouds (i.e. trials). A few people I have shared my PPD news with simply blew it off and said, “Oh, you just need to spend more time around people!” (unhelpful advice) or “Yeah, I had depression for about 3 weeks. Then it just kind of went away” as if it was something that just goes away on its' own, which it most certainly does not. I think one point I would add to your list is: It goes away as you adjust to being a mom. (Because when it's a biological imbalance, there is NO way it goes away on its' own, no matter how hard you wish and try and work to be your normal, sane, happy, pre-baby self. It's a really frustrating thing 🙁

  13. YES. I was nodding throughout this whole post. I can relate to everything. Thanks for sharing!! Great job. The more I research PPD, the more I've learned that it's actually quite common for the PPD symptoms to manifest themselves between 4-6 months after the baby. My symptoms crept up around 4 months post partum, which caught me off-guard and led me to believe it was something else other than PPD. I had no idea!! With your first baby, you have no context for how difficult it's supposed to be. You always just hear that it's “really hard”. I am working on a post for my own blog to tell my friends and family what I've “experienced” these past 8 months. I have only told a few close friends and a couple of family members about my depression. It's really personal and incredibly tender to talk about these experiences and so I hesitate because people tend to paint a silver lining on other's gray clouds (i.e. trials). A few people I have shared my PPD news with simply blew it off and said, “Oh, you just need to spend more time around people!” (unhelpful advice) or “Yeah, I had depression for about 3 weeks. Then it just kind of went away” as if it was something that just goes away on its' own, which it most certainly does not. I think one point I would add to your list is: It goes away as you adjust to being a mom. (Because when it's a biological imbalance, there is NO way it goes away on its' own, no matter how hard you wish and try and work to be your normal, sane, happy, pre-baby self. It's a really frustrating thing 🙁

  14. I think it's awesome that more women are becoming more open about this. So many mom's go through this and it sucks that they would ever have to feel like it's only them that suffer from PPD.

  15. Girl In Beta says:

    I think continuing the dialogue about this is really important. So many of my friends have struggled with this, and a lot of times it's chalked up to being “an adjustment.”

    Umm, no.

    Thanks for sharing.

  16. Christen P says:

    For me, and I would be interested to hear if it is the same for others, I did not really know I had PPD or how deep into it I was until it was gone.

  17. Marian Go says:

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

  18. Thank you for sharing! I'll have to keep this in mind for when the time comes. 🙂

  19. Thank you so much for sharing this! I wish this post was around after I had my baby.

  20. Thank you for this… I'm guilty of lying to the health nurses when they asked me questions about my mental health after both babies because I was scared they were going to take them away if I told them deep down I thought I didn't want them and that I had made a mistake… I was scared to even ask other moms if they felt that way because I thought people would look at me like I was awful. It's something that needs to be talked about more openly because it is real and you just feel so darn alone… so again, thank you.

  21. It is wonderful to open up about a topic – even when you don't feel completely comfortable writing about it. I think with all mental health, it is something that happens to many people and it is difficult to stop chastising yourself for feeling a certain way. There are days when I accept that I am “crazy” but really, I'm not. Mental health issues are a chemical imbalance so while it may be “normal” it isn't something to ignore!

  22. This is really encouraging! I don't have kids yet, but I've always been worried that this might happen to me. Thanks for the reminder that it happens to lots of women, and it's not a bad thing to talk about it or get some help.

  23. I feel like I went through some of this with my second child and I feel like it came unexpectedly because I was so excited and happy about him.

  24. Lauren says:

    I love your story and it's eye opening. Since I am not a mom (yet), I find these posts really insightful.

  25. Love that you shared your story – there are so many women suffering from this and there is nothing to be ashamed of.

  26. Neely says:

    I love how open you are

  27. This is really honest and wonderfully written. Thanks for sharing it with all of us.

  28. Beautifully written. Thank you for sharing!

  29. Avie T says:

    Thank you for sharing, this was written so wonderful!

  30. Alyssa says:

    I'm expecting a baby in January so I don't know much about this, but it's always great to read these kinds of posts and be educated!

  31. Bria Dawkins says:

    This post taught me quite a bit. Thank you for being earnest about your experience.

  32. Ayana says:

    Thank you for your honesty about this. If only we spoke more about it, then women won't feel the need to suffer in silence. Thank you for this beautifully written post.

    Thrifting Diva
    http://www.thriftingdiva.com

  33. Thank you for sharing your story, I'm sure writing this was hard for you. I remember about a week after I had my first baby my husband came home and I was just curled up on the couch bawling for no reason and had been crying all day. Those first few weeks are a roller coaster and I am happy that you are feeling better!

  34. Cam says:

    Thanks for sharing. I'd heard that it was normal for moms to get the blues. After my first child, it was hard to get back into my groove. He was a c-section. My daughter was a normal delivery and I swear I bounced back immediately.

    People don't often talk about ALL the things that come along with having a child. PPD is something that really should be given more of a platform. Women who suffer from it would feel supported and would seek help sooner because it wouldn't be such a taboo topic.

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